Battle for the Net – Join the Internet Countdown

Battle for the Net Join the Internet Countdown

Last year, more than 40,000 websites participated in the Internet Slowdown to demand real net neutrality. It worked! But monopolistic Cable companies are pouring millions into a last ditch effort to derail the FCC’s historic vote. Help us flood Washington, DC with calls and emails to show lawmakers that the whole Internet is watching, and we’re literally counting down the seconds until we get real net neutrality.

Read more HERE.

Happy Thanksgiving 2014

Thanksgiving Day in the United States is a holiday on the fourth Thursday of November. Thanksgiving Day is traditionally a day for families and friends to get together for a special meal. The meal often includes a turkey, stuffing, potatoes, cranberry sauce, gravy, pumpkin pie, and vegetables. Thanksgiving Day is a time for many people to give thanks for what they have. Thanksgiving Day parades are held in some cities and towns on or around Thanksgiving Day. Some parades or festivities also mark the opening of the Christmas shopping season. Some people have a four-day weekend so it is a popular time for trips and to visit family and friends.

The History of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Quick Facts

Video’s courtesy of History.com
www.history.com/

President Obama’s Plan for a Free and Open Internet

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More than any other invention of our time, the Internet has unlocked possibilities we could just barely imagine a generation ago. And here’s a big reason we’ve seen such incredible growth and innovation: Most Internet providers have treated Internet traffic equally. That’s a principle known as “net neutrality” — and it says that an entrepreneur’s fledgling company should have the same chance to succeed as established corporations, and that access to a high school student’s blog shouldn’t be unfairly slowed down to make way for advertisers with more money.

That’s what President Obama believes, and what he means when he says there should be no gatekeepers between you and your favorite online sites and services.

And as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) considers new rules for how to safeguard competition and user choice, we cannot take that principle of net neutrality for granted. Ensuring a free and open Internet is the only way we can preserve the Internet’s power to connect our world. That’s why the President has laid out a plan to do it, and is asking the FCC to implement it.

Watch President Obama explain his plan, then read his statement and forward it on.

 

The President’s Statement

 

White House

An open Internet is essential to the American economy, and increasingly to our very way of life. By lowering the cost of launching a new idea, igniting new political movements, and bringing communities closer together, it has been one of the most significant democratizing influences the world has ever known.

“Net neutrality” has been built into the fabric of the Internet since its creation — but it is also a principle that we cannot take for granted. We cannot allow Internet service providers (ISPs) to restrict the best access or to pick winners and losers in the online marketplace for services and ideas. That is why today, I am asking the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to answer the call of almost 4 million public comments, and implement the strongest possible rules to protect net neutrality.

When I was a candidate for this office, I made clear my commitment to a free and open Internet, and my commitment remains as strong as ever. Four years ago, the FCC tried to implement rules that would protect net neutrality with little to no impact on the telecommunications companies that make important investments in our economy. After the rules were challenged, the court reviewing the rules agreed with the FCC that net neutrality was essential for preserving an environment that encourages new investment in the network, new online services and content, and everything else that makes up the Internet as we now know it. Unfortunately, the court ultimately struck down the rules — not because it disagreed with the need to protect net neutrality, but because it believed the FCC had taken the wrong legal approach.

  • No blocking. If a consumer requests access to a website or service, and the content is legal, your ISP should not be permitted to block it. That way, every player — not just those commercially affiliated with an ISP — gets a fair shot at your business.
  • No throttling. Nor should ISPs be able to intentionally slow down some content or speed up others — through a process often called “throttling” — based on the type of service or your ISP’s preferences.
  • Increased transparency. The connection between consumers and ISPs — the so-called “last mile” — is not the only place some sites might get special treatment. So, I am also asking the FCC to make full use of the transparency authorities the court recently upheld, and if necessary to apply net neutrality rules to points of interconnection between the ISP and the rest of the Internet.
  • No paid prioritization. Simply put: No service should be stuck in a “slow lane” because it does not pay a fee. That kind of gatekeeping would undermine the level playing field essential to the Internet’s growth. So, as I have before, I am asking for an explicit ban on paid prioritization and any other restriction that has a similar effect.

If carefully designed, these rules should not create any undue burden for ISPs, and can have clear, monitored exceptions for reasonable network management and for specialized services such as dedicated, mission-critical networks serving a hospital. But combined, these rules mean everything for preserving the Internet’s openness.

The rules also have to reflect the way people use the Internet today, which increasingly means on a mobile device. I believe the FCC should make these rules fully applicable to mobile broadband as well, while recognizing the special challenges that come with managing wireless networks.

To be current, these rules must also build on the lessons of the past. For almost a century, our law has recognized that companies who connect you to the world have special obligations not to exploit the monopoly they enjoy over access in and out of your home or business. That is why a phone call from a customer of one phone company can reliably reach a customer of a different one, and why you will not be penalized solely for calling someone who is using another provider. It is common sense that the same philosophy should guide any service that is based on the transmission of information — whether a phone call, or a packet of data.

So the time has come for the FCC to recognize that broadband service is of the same importance and must carry the same obligations as so many of the other vital services do. To do that, I believe the FCC should reclassify consumer broadband service under Title II of the Telecommunications Act — while at the same time forbearing from rate regulation and other provisions less relevant to broadband services. This is a basic acknowledgment of the services ISPs provide to American homes and businesses, and the straightforward obligations necessary to ensure the network works for everyone — not just one or two companies.

Investment in wired and wireless networks has supported jobs and made America the center of a vibrant ecosystem of digital devices, apps, and platforms that fuel growth and expand opportunity. Importantly, network investment remained strong under the previous net neutrality regime, before it was struck down by the court; in fact, the court agreed that protecting net neutrality helps foster more investment and innovation. If the FCC appropriately forbears from the Title II regulations that are not needed to implement the principles above — principles that most ISPs have followed for years — it will help ensure new rules are consistent with incentives for further investment in the infrastructure of the Internet.

The Internet has been one of the greatest gifts our economy — and our society — has ever known. The FCC was chartered to promote competition, innovation, and investment in our networks. In service of that mission, there is no higher calling than protecting an open, accessible, and free Internet. I thank the Commissioners for having served this cause with distinction and integrity, and I respectfully ask them to adopt the policies I have outlined here, to preserve this technology’s promise for today, and future generations to come.

Original post at The White House website HERE

Net neutrality activists blockade FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s house

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Originally posted at Fight for the Future

Whoah! We just heard about this. Activists from PopularResistance.org organized one of the first ever acts of civil disobedience for net neutrality this morning when they blockaded corrupt FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s driveway just as he was getting into his car.

Check out Popular Resistance’s press release below, and follow them @PopResistance on twitter for breaking action updates.
Original link: https://www.popularresistance.org/breaking-net-neutrality-activists-blockade-fcc-chairman-tom-wheelers-house/

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Email: info@popularresistance.org
Kevin Zeese 301-996-6520
Margaret Flowers 410-591-0892

Net Neutrality Advocates Blockade FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s Georgetown Home
Demand Full Reclassification under Title II, No Hybrid Plan

Advocates for net neutrality who oppose the tiered Internet proposed by FCC Chairman, Tom Wheeler, blockaded his driveway this morning, Monday, November 10, 2014, just as the Chairman was getting into his car. Six people participated in the blockade with a large banner that read “Save the Internet.” They also held signs demanding that Wheeler listen to the people. They chanted “Hey Hey, Ho Ho, Tom Wheeler has got to go” and sang “Which side are you on Tom? Are you with the people or with the Telecoms?”

The protest, which kicked off at 6:55am, is organized by PopularResistance.org, the same group that Occupied the FCC from May 7 to May 15. They are demanding that Wheeler drop plans to advance so-called “hybrid” rules that fail to protect free speech, and fully reclassify the Internet as a common carrier under Title II.

“We’re blockading Tom Wheeler’s driveway because he’s made it clear that when he goes to work, he’s not working for the public, he’s working for Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T, the companies that used to pay his salary when he was a lobbyist for the Cable industry,” said Kevin Zeese, co-director of Popular Resistance, “The future of the Internet is a life or death matter for marginalized people all over the world. We cannot in good conscience allow this corrupt official to carry on with business as usual.”

“The Internet is an essential tool in all of our lives for many reasons such as the growing citizen’s media, information sharing and access to goods and services. All people must have equal access to content without discrimination. Wealthy corporations should not get faster Internet delivery service than start-ups and citizens’ groups. ” said Margaret Flowers, MD, co-director of Popular Resistance.

Zeese added “The FCC received a record number of comments, with more than 3.7 million responding to the rulemaking proceeding on the future of the Internet; 99% of those comments favored net neutrality and reclassification. How dare Chairman Wheeler ignore the overwhelming majority of the people in favor of corporations like Comcast, Verizon and AT&T. Tom Wheeler is playing with fire. We will be escalating our protests if he continues down the path of ignoring the people. If Wheeler is unable to fulfill President Obama’s promise to protect net neutrality, then he should resign or be removed from office.”

Wheeler served as the top lobbyist for Internet corporations before becoming chair of the FCC. “This is a crisis of democracy. The people have clearly spoken and Wheeler is supposed to represent the public interest, not the interests of Comcast and Verizon. It is time for him to listen to the public and reclassify the Internet as a common carrier so it can be regulated like a public utility,” added Flowers.

Popular Resistance is urging people to join them at a Vigil to Save the Internet tonight, November 10th, at Tom Wheeler’s Georgetown home. Journalists or activists interested in attending should contact Margaret Flowers or Kevin Zeese at the numbers above. Following successful nationwide protests last week, the group is also working with other net neutrality advocates to hold a Dance Party to Save the Internet at the White House on Thursday evening, November 13th, at 6 PM in Lafayette Park.

Looks like a trip to urgent care is needed

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Looks like a trip to urgent care is needed, my Daughter is under the weather. It started as a sore throat last Thursday with no signs of a cold or flu. Last night it was getting worse for her and now today she is having trouble swallowing water. Last night I did take a look with a flashlight and her throat was red and swollen. None of the medicines and home remedies we have tried seem to be working, I will be taking her in shortly.

UPDATE:
Update on my Daughter, We suspected as much she has strep throat. She is on antibiotics for ten days and still contagious for 24 hours. Things are looking up at this point.

Our First Snow Has Arrived

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Looks like winter is officially here.

This is what it looked like out my living room window late yesterday afternoon. It looks like Old Man Winter is here in Northwestern Minnesota according to Mother Nature, that is if you’re going to base it on the fact of whether we have snow or not. The temperature has been running around 20 degrees Fahrenheit during the day time.

Save The Internet Protests Across The USA

internet-protestersPhoto by Reuters / Steve Dipaola

Net neutrality advocates took to the streets in over a dozen cities across the America, part of an emergency protest against a leaked “hybrid” proposal by the Federal Communications Commission to allow internet companies to charge more for faster service Organized by advocacy groups like Fight for the Future, Popular Resistance and Free Press, the protests were held outside of the White House in Washington, DC, as well as in cities such as New York, Boston, Chicago, and Las Vegas.

save-the-internetPhoto by RT.com

Under the FCC’s new “hybrid” proposal, currently being considered by Chairman Tom Wheeler, the plan would separate broadband into two distinct services: a retail one, in which consumers would pay broadband providers for Internet access; and a back-end one, in which broadband providers serve as the conduit for websites to distribute content, wrote Gautham Nagesh of the Wall Street Journal. Read more at RT.com …

Reggie Rockenroni – Mr Mouse – Toontown Online

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Reggie *Waves*

It’s been a little over a year since Disney closed Toontown Online and Reggie Rockenroni “The Blue Doggie” and Mr Mouse still receive mail from people stopping by his website and taking the time to use the “Contact” page to say Hi.

Reggie and Mr Mouse say

THANK YOU!

reggie-showoff
Did you know that our old forum ToonTown Valley is still online? Well actually, it was renamed to Electric Blue Fire but it’s still there. After all this time I just haven’t been able to bring myself to take it off line and store it away. Don’t bother looking for it it’s behind a firewall but it’s still running! I haven’t been in there in a really long time but the last time I was it was kinda spooky and ghostly like. I mean there’s no one there and hasn’t been in quite some time. I guess I was always hoping that Disney was coming out with V2 or they would see how much we all missed it and they would bring Toontown back. It’s kinda sad in a way all the old first Toontown forums are gone now.

There’s no love like the first love
Reggie loved Disneys Toontown Online

The Blue Doggie (Reggie) *waves*
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